Wednesday, October 11, 2017

IT'S NOT ONLY HARVEY











It’s not only Harvey
it’s not only Hollywood
it’s not about “compliments”
it’s not about sex addiction
it’s not even about sex.

It's about the entitlement of the male gaze,
to stare, judge and condemn.
It's about the misguided authority
to tell women what to do,
even what expression to wear:
Smile! Don't look so serious.
At least that got a smile out of you. 
It’s about cat-calling
It’s about treating women like pets
like animals in a zoo 
like entertainment
like vaginas
like breeders
like trophies 
or luxury toys
like nonentities.
It’s about POWER.

I once stood on the sidewalk 
with a large group of women 
(power in numbers)
and we cat-called all the men
walking past. 
We whistled and yelled: 
Yo, handsome 
Why don’t you smile?
Look at that tushie
etc.

Not one man looked pleased 
or flattered or complimented.
They all looked alarmed, 
uncomfortable 
and some, a little scared.
Because cat-calling is an assault.
Never a compliment.

There's only one way to get respect:
reject, report and LAUGH at harassers' suggestions.
Understand that "groping", "fondling" and "unwanted touching"
is SEXUAL ASSAULT/BATTERY.
Then lawyer up.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Sexual Offenses Act of 2003
Verbal Harassment
Penal Code 243.4 PC, (groping)
                            *        

















HARASSMENT, SEXISM, WEINSTEIN, MISOGYNY


Friday, September 8, 2017

ART inspired by BOOKS




Pablo PICASSO’s 1955 India ink sketch 
of DON QUIXOTE and Sancho Panza
was featured on the August 18–24 
issue of the French weekly journal 
Les Lettres Françaises in celebration 
of the 350th anniversary of the first
part of Cervantes’s DON QUIXOTE.
 
(Cover art by Gustave Doré)
Miguel CERVANTES, perhaps the only 
writer ever captured by pirates, 
wrote the epic novel
(EL INGENIOSO HIDALGO DON QUIJOTE DE LA MANCHA).
Part I published 1605 - Part II 1615, it
is considered the most influential work
of literature in the entire Spanish canon
and has spawned the adjective “quixotic”
 ------


British artist Sir John EVERETT Millais painted OPHELIA singing before she drowns. 1851- 1852.
Oil on canvas. 
Inspired by Shakespeare’s 
play HAMLET.
William SHAKESPEARE’s
written between 1599 and 1602 and
derived from the legend of Amleth.
It is his longest and most
influential work:
who among us has not asked
at some point in our life
“Etre ou ne pas être?”
------




Salvador DALI’s 
DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE 
was based on Lewis Carroll’s 
ALICE IN WONDERLAND. 
One of twelve heliogravures, 
one for each chapter of the
book published by 
Maecenas Press - 
Random House, 
New York in 1969.

In 1862 Charles Dodgson, a shy Oxford
mathematician with a stammer,
created a story about a little girl
tumbling down a rabbit hole 
under the pen name Lewis Carroll:
Insipid Alice is a bit of a bore but
who doesn’t love the Mad Hatter,
the Queen of Hearts,
the Cheshire cat?
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** See also BOOKS inspired by ART **
 
art, books, painting, picasso, cervantes, Carroll, Dali, Shakespeare

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

THREE FRENCH NUDES






NU DESCENDANT UN ESCALIER No. 2 1912,
Marcel Duchamp.
Oil on canvas.
(Philadelphia Museum of Art)
This painting scandalised 

New Yorkers at the
Armory Show in 1913

 1887-1968. (Photo: Man Ray)
French painter, cartoonist, sculptor, chess master, writer,
Duchamp, along with Matisse and Picasso
had an enormous impact on art.
He rejected “retinal” art and chose to make
 thought-provoking art.

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NUS DANS LA FORÊT, 1910
Fernand LÉGER. 
(Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands)
Exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants in 1911 it’s 
considered Léger's first 
major work showing his 
alliance with Cubism.

Joseph Fernand Henri LEGER
1881-1955
French painter, sculptor and filmmaker.
An early cubist, his work evolved
into more tubular forms with
primary colors, causing his style 
to be called "Tubism".
In 1938, Nelson Rockefeller commissioned 
him to decorate his New York apartment!

----------------



STANDING FEMALE NUDE
Pablo PICASSO 1910. 
Charcoal on paper 
(Met New York.) 
Some think this is 
composed of 
the letters of 
Picasso’s name.








Pablo PICASSO 1881 – 1971
(Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno
María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y Picasso)

Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist,

 stage designer, poet and playwright.
He wrote two surrealist plays: 

“Desire Caught by the Tail” 1941 
and “Les Quatre Petites Filles”, 
the former performed as a reading by himself, 
Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir
Valentine Hugo and directed by Albert Camus.
*

ART, PICASSO, DUCHAMP, LEGER, CUBISM, TUBISM

Monday, August 14, 2017

LIVING WITH GREAT ART

It occured to me recently that, thanks to the internet, I could have the world’s best art on my walls. I’ve always had the world’ best literature in my bookcases and now I could have the pictures to go with it.

Downloaded art may not have the intimacy of real-life brush work or the excitement of light gleaming on a paint smear and maybe the colors aren’t exactly the same, but wow, Leonardos and Giottos and Rembrandts on my very own walls.
Thrilling. 

Every time I walk past one of my favorites, hot fudge fills my chest as I savor again Uccello's beautiful compositions, grin at Picasso's arrogant angles, wince at the agonies of Bacon. 

Living with great art makes you straighten up as you pass a masterpiece and aim a little higher in your endeavors.
 
GUERNICA - a mural-sized painting 11′ 6″ x 25′ 6″
Oil on canvas by Spanish artist Pablo PICASSO
 April 26, 1937–June 1937, in Paris.
(Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain)
- Picasso requested that Guernica should remain
 at MOMA in NY until Franco died and 
only then be returned to Spain. 
Being an expressionof national outrage,
this painting has never been sold.


------


 RHYTHMS OF A SLAUGHTER Triptych, Three Studies for a Crucifixion, 1962 
Oil and sand on canvas by Francis BACON Irish-born British artist 1909-1992
(The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York)
- Bacon’s work isn't easy on the eye but I do like the cheery tangerine of 
these three paintings despite the cowering lumps of bloody gristle.
-------

THE BATTLE OF SAN ROMANO, another triptych
this one by Paolo UCCELLO. Tempera on wood panels. 1435 - 1460
(National Gallery, London /Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence /Musée du Louvre, Paris)
- Uccello is easy on the eye: fat, prancing horses, designy lances, 
colorful pennants and turbaned warriors fighting in an orange grove.
*
art, uccello, picasso, bacon

Saturday, August 5, 2017

BOOKS inspired by ART

Giorgio de CHIRICO’s oil painting  
THE ENIGMA OF ARRIVAL AND THE AFTERNOON 
(Privately owned)
was painted in Paris in 1912. The French poet Guillaume Apollinaire gave
the painting its title.


Nobel Prize winner V.S NAIPAUL’s 
cold, bereft, partly autobiographical book 
can be fully appreciated only by an immigrant.
Its title, THE ENIGMA OF ARRIVAL, 
was inspired by the sail, hinting at arrival,
 in CHIRICO’s eponymous painting.
                                    ----------------------- 




THE GOLDFINCH (HET PUTTERTJE),
Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands.
Oil on panel, a trompe-l’oeil painted by Dutchman 
Carel FABRITIUS in 1654, 
the year of his death.

In the 17th century, goldfinches 
were
popular pets because they
could be trained to draw 
water from a bowl with a 
miniature bucket.





The Fabritius painting is a key element in
Donna TART’s 2014 Pulitzer Prize winning 
novel THE GOLDFINCH
 ““The Goldfinch” is a rarity that comes along
 perhaps half a dozen times per decade,
 a smartly written literary novel that
 connects with the heart
 as well as the mind.” –
 Stephen King
                                     -----------------------




THE GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING (MEISJE MET DE PAREL) Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands1665 tronie oil painting by Dutchman Johannes VERMEER. 
Thought to be a portrait of his
daughter.


THE GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING
by Tracey CHEVALIER tells the story of 
Griet, whose life is transformed by
 her brief encounter with genius...
even as she herself is 
immortalized... 
                                                     *
>> See also ART inspired by BOOKS <<

                     ART, BOOKS, LITERATURE, PAINTING, PAINTINGandLITERATURE

Sunday, July 23, 2017

CAKES inspired by ART



“CHOCOLATE CAKE” 1971 is a lithograph on Arches paper (SFMOMA) by American artist Wayne Thiebaud.
  
That lithograph baked into life by Caitlin Freeman.
A work of art based on a work of art 
but, unfortunately, no longer 
being baked at SFMOMA.

-------------------------------------




Piet Mondrian’s   “COMPOSITION WITH RED, YELLOW AND BLUE”
1927 (Tate, London) 





The MONDRIAN CAKE, also baked by Caitlin Freeman
Recipes for these cakes and other art cakes can be found in 

-------------------------------------

THE KISS 1907–08, oil on canvas, (Östereichische Galerie Belvedere, Vienna) by Austrian artist Gustav KLIMT

A beautiful Klimt Kiss-inspired cake baked by the 

*
ART, CAKE, ARTCAKE, MONDRIAN, TIEBAUD, KLIMT, BAKING, PAINTING

Sunday, July 16, 2017

TWITTER FOLLOWERS CAN'T SEE WHAT YOU 💗

Don't 💗 my Tweets. 
RT them but don't 💗 them.

It used to be that if you liked something on Twitter you'd RT it.
Then Twitter added the 💗
Everybody thought a 💗 worked like an RT and followers could still see what you 💗


WRONG.

Your 💗s don’t appear in your timeline.

Check you timeline: you won't see any of your 💗s there.
So your followers can’t see what you 💗

Only the recipient sees your 💗 
Your 💗s go into your LIKES file, used only by ADVERTISERS to sell you stuff based on your 💗s.

So, responding to a personal Tweet or promo with a 💗 is a waste of time. Nobody will see it, nobody will be able to make contact or a purchase or enjoy anything you 💗.  
So, now you understand why, if you 💗 my Tweets, I'll take it as a personal insult. :-)         

The 💗 has practically killed Twitter as an interactive medium.

The point of Twitter is to get our Tweets to as many people as possible. And the only way to do that is to RT.
An RT appears in your timeline and reaches all our followers & their followers & so on. Potentially hundreds, thousands, even millions of people could see an RT. People who may want to follow us, contact us, buy something we're selling, or simply be amused or enriched by the Tweet.
 

If you don’t RT what you like to your followers, Twitter will never be anything more than an advertising platform for BIG BRANDS and FAMOUS people.  
                                                           
*
     Twitter, RT don’t LIKE, Take Back Twitter

Sunday, June 11, 2017

ANTHONY DOERR

Many accomplished contemporary writers can suck us into their worlds through the first page, efficiently introduce their characters already in full gallop then wow us with their style, vocabulary, observations and deep thoughts. But they rarely leave us time to look around the space they’ve created, to examine what and with whom we’re dealing before the story hustles us along. So much is thrown at us so fast that we feel a bit bludgeoned, somewhat overwhelmed by action, sometimes smothered in solipsism and often overtaken by claustrophobia. 


ANTHONY DOERR doesn’t do any of that. The Pulitzer-prize winning author is one of those rare people who seems to have maintained a child-like curiosity and wonder about life despite his education and adulthood. He creates wide, spacious worlds full of light and air and his characters, seen from afar at first, are slowly brought into focus, as is the story. He uses short sentences and simple but unexpected words with occasional anthropomorphisms that make the text twitch. He believes the right details in the right places will convince his readers of what he’s trying to convey. And does he ever use details. Not lists of them à la Joyce Carol Oates or screeds of empty adjectives but pulsating nouns and verbs that create images writhing with color and textures like a Goghian painting. Cypresses seethe, roots prowl, helicopters ratchet, fountains roar and stars burn.  A myriad details are tossed on to the page like confetti. We assemble the details into the mosaic he wants us to see. We read like Seurat paints, our senses aquiver with dots of sights, sounds, smells, textures and flavors as the story moves us along at the speed of an eyeball. There are no boring bits to skip.

Doerr is one of the few writers who can also shock you into stopping and going back to re-read a passage to make sure you read it correctly.

In FOUR SEASONS IN ROME he writes about Romans’ acceptance of death:  “I agree to live now, live as sweetly as I can, to fill my clothes with wind and my eyes with lights...” 

And he does lovely slow endings too, gliding us down to a soft landing as if he doesn’t want to stop writing, just as we don’t want to stop reading. He wraps up the story but
continues to reveal a few more things that keep us in his world just a little longer. It’s the reluctant parting of lovers.

These quotes are mostly from FOUR SEASONS IN ROME which I started reading immediately after finishing ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE because I didn’t want to leave his worlds or words.

*
Books, writers, authors,